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Antonio-Villalba v. Hollingsworth

United States District Court, Third Circuit

May 29, 2013

MARCO ANTONIO-VILLALBA, Petitioner,
v.
JORDAN R. HOLLINGSWORTH, Respondent.

Marco Antonio-Villalba, #50519-018 FCI Fort Dix, Fort Dix, NJ, Petitioner Pro Se.

OPINION

RENÉE MARIE BUMB, District Judge.

Marco Antonio-Villalba, a federal inmate confined at FCI Fort Dix in New Jersey, filed a Petition for a Writ of Habeas Corpus under 28 U.S.C. § 2241 challenging his imprisonment pursuant to a federal sentence imposed in the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida. Having thoroughly reviewed all papers filed by Petitioner, this Court will dismiss the Petition for lack of jurisdiction.

I. BACKGROUND

Petitioner pled guilty to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute five or more kilograms of cocaine while on board a vessel subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, in violation of the Maritime Drug Law Enforcement Act, 46 U.S.C. §§ 70503(a)(1), 70506(a), and 70506(b), and 21 U.S.C. § 960(b)(1)(B)(ii). (Supplemental Pleading with exhibits, docket entry no. 4, Exhibit A.) On May 8, 2009, he was sentenced to a 164 month term of imprisonment. (Petition, docket entry no. 1, memorandum at pg. 3.; see also United States v. Rengifo, et al, Criminal No. 08-0459 (M.D. Fla.) (Petitioner's underlying criminal conviction.).

Petitioner is now incarcerated at FCI Fort Dix in New Jersey and signed his § 2241 Petition on December 20, 2012. He brings this case stating two grounds for relief: "Recent Circuit Court Law (11th Cir.) no jurisdiction" and "Illegal Incarceration - no jurisdiction to impose a sentence." (Petition, docket entry no. 1, page 6 of 8.)

Petitioner states that on or about October 16, 2008 he was "illegally seized from territorial waters" by the United States Coast guard 28 miles off the coast of Colombia. (Petition, docket entry no. 1, memorandum at pg. 3.) Petitioner states that the United States Coast Guard had no jurisdiction in the territorial waters and that the sentencing court did not have jurisdiction to impose any prison sentence.

In his memorandum, Petitioner argues that pursuant to United States v. Bellaizac-Hurtado , 700 F.3d 1245 (11th Cir. 2012), the sentencing court was without jurisdiction to impose a sentence, and the "act for which Petitioner was convicted is no longer considered to be a crime, and he cannot raise this issue in a § 2255 motion." (Petition, docket entry no. 1, memorandum at pg. 1.)

II. DISCUSSION

Section 2241 of Title 28 of the United States Code provides that the writ of habeas corpus shall not extend to a prisoner unless he "is in custody in violation of the Constitution or laws or treaties of the United States." 28 U.S.C. § 2241(c)(3). Nevertheless, a challenge to the validity of a federal conviction or sentence must be brought under 28 U.S.C. § 2255. See Davis v. United States , 417 U.S. 333 (1974); Okereke v. United States , 307 F.3d 117, 120 (3d Cir. 2002). This is because 28 U.S.C. § 2255 expressly prohibits a district court from entertaining a challenge to a prisoner's federal sentence under § 2241 unless the remedy by motion under § 2255 is "inadequate or ineffective to test the legality of his detention." See 28 U.S.C. § 2255(e);[1] see Cradle v. U.S. ex rel. Miner , 290 F.3d 536 (3d Cir. 2002); In re Dorsainvil , 119 F.3d 245, 251 (3d Cir. 1997); Millan-Diaz v. Parker , 444 F.2d 95 (3d Cir. 1971); Application of Galante , 437 F.2d 1164 (3d Cir. 1971) (per curiam); United States ex rel. Leguillou v. Davis , 212 F.2d 681, 684 (3d Cir. 1954).

A § 2255 motion is inadequate or ineffective, authorizing resort to § 2241, only where the petitioner demonstrates that he "had no prior opportunity to challenge his conviction for a crime that an intervening change in substantive law could negate with retroactive application." Okereke v. United States , 307 F.3d 117, 120 (3d Cir. 2002) (citing Dorsainvil , 119 F.3d at 251). For example, in Dorsainvil, the Third Circuit held that § 2255 was inadequate or ineffective for Dorsainvil's claim that he was imprisoned for conduct that the Supreme Court ruled in Bailey v. United States , 516 U.S. 137 (1995), was not a crime, where the Supreme Court issued Bailey after Dorsainvil's § 2255 motion was denied on the merits and after the Third Circuit ruled that Dorsainvil could not meet either of the gatekeeping requirements under 28 U.S.C. § 2255(h) to authorize the filing of a second or successive § 2255 motion.[2] See Dorsainvil , 119 F.3d at 250 ("A Supreme Court decision interpreting a criminal statute that resulted in the imprisonment of one whose conduct was not prohibited by law presents exceptional circumstances where the need for the remedy afforded by the writ of habeas corpus is apparent").

Here, Petitioner claims that he is imprisoned for conduct that the Eleventh Circuit (the circuit wherein he was convicted) deemed non-criminal in United States v. Bellaizac-Hurtado , 700 F.3d 1245 (11th Cir. 2012) (after his conviction became final and the time to file a § 2255 motion expired). In Bellaizac-Hurtado, the Eleventh Circuit reversed convictions under the Maritime Drug Law Enforcement Act on direct appeal on the ground that Congress lacked "the power under the Offences Clause to proscribe drug trafficking in the territorial waters of another nation."[3] Id. at 1249.

In this case, the holding of Bellaizac-Hurtado does not render Petitioner's conduct non-criminal because here Petitioner was convicted of drug trafficking in international waters, not in the territorial waters of another nation.

The United States recognizes a territorial sea of 12 nautical miles. See Argentine Republic v. Amerada Hess Shipping Corp. , 488 U.S. 428, 441 n.8 (1989) ("On December 28, 1988, the President announced that the United States would henceforth recognize a territorial sea of 12 nautical miles"); 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, Dec. 10, 1982, 1833 U.N.T.S. 3, art. 3 (entered into force Nov. 16, 1994) (Territorial waters are the coastal waters extending seaward at most for four leagues or twelve nautical miles from the baseline of a nation, and the high seas is the entire body of waters stretching seaward of the nation's territorial waters).

In his Petition, Petitioner asserts that he was seized 28 miles off the coast of Colombia. (Petition, docket entry no. 1, memorandum at pg. 3.) Thus, the vessel on which Petitioner was apprehended was in international waters lying beyond the recognized 12 mile territorial limit.

Therefore, this is not a case where subsequent jurisprudence has rendered defendant's conduct non-criminal under United States law. In addition, unlike Dorsainvil, Petitioner did not raise or attempt to raise his Bellaizac-Hurtado challenge in a § 2255 motion in the Middle District of Florida. Accordingly, this Court finds that § 2255 is not an inadequate or ineffective remedy for Petitioner's claim and will dismiss the Petition for lack of jurisdiction.

For all the foregoing reasons, the Petition will be dismissed for lack of jurisdiction. See Castillo v. Hollingsworth, Civil No. 12-7831 , 2013 WL 1288196 (D.N.J. March 26, 2013) (collecting cases).

III. CONCLUSION

The Court dismisses the Petition for lack of jurisdiction.

Petitioner's Motion to Amend Petition [6], Motion to Supplement Pleading [8], and Motion for Court Order [9] will be DENIED as moot. An appropriate order follows.


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