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Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., As Trustee v. Sandra A. Ford

January 28, 2011

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE, PLAINTIFF-RESPONDENT,
v.
SANDRA A. FORD, DEFENDANT-APPELLANT.



On appeal from Superior Court of New Jersey, Chancery Division, Bergen County, Docket No. F-12259-06.

NOT FOR PUBLICATION WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE APPELLATE DIVISION

APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION

Argued October 5, 2010

Before Judges Skillman, Yannotti and Espinosa.

The opinion of the court was delivered by SKILLMAN, P.J.A.D.

This appeal presents significant issues regarding the evidence required to establish the standing of an alleged assignee of a mortgage and negotiable note to maintain a foreclosure action.

On March 6, 2005, defendant Sandra A. Ford executed a negotiable note to secure repayment of $403,750 she borrowed from Argent Mortgage Company (Argent) and a mortgage on her residence in Westwood. Defendant alleges that Argent engaged in various predatory and fraudulent acts in connection with this transaction.

Five days later, on March 11, 2005, Argent purportedly assigned the mortgage and note to plaintiff Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. (Wells Fargo). Wells Fargo claims that it acquired the status of a holder in due course as a result of this assignment and therefore is not subject to any of the defenses defendant may have been able to assert against Argent.

Defendant allegedly stopped making payments on the note in the spring of 2006, and on July 14, 2006, Wells Fargo filed this mortgage foreclosure action. In an amended complaint, Wells Fargo asserted that Argent had assigned the mortgage and note to Wells Fargo but that the assignment had not yet been recorded.

On August 24, 2006, defendant, appearing pro se, filed an answer and counterclaim, which alleged that Argent had committed predatory and fraudulent acts in connection with execution of the mortgage and note and questioned the validity of the purported assignment to Wells Fargo. Defendant's counterclaim asserted claims under various federal and state statutes.

Defendant also filed a demand for the production of documents relating to the execution of the mortgage and note and purported assignment to Wells Fargo. In response, Wells Fargo produced copies of the mortgage, note, and purported assignment. Wells Fargo also produced various documents defendant allegedly executed in applying to Argent for the mortgage.

Wells Fargo subsequently filed a motion for summary judgment. This motion was supported by a certification of Josh Baxley, who identified himself as "Supervisor of Fidelity National as an attorney in fact for HomEq Servicing Corporation as attorney in fact for [Wells Fargo]." Baxley's certification stated: "I have knowledge of the amount due Plaintiff for principal, interest and/or other charges pursuant to the mortgage due upon the mortgage made by Sandra A. Ford dated March 6, 2005, given to Argent Mortgage Company, LLC, to secure the sum of $403,750.00." Baxley did not indicate the source of this purported knowledge. Baxley's certification also alleged that Wells Fargo is "the holder and owner of the said Note/Bond and Mortgage" executed by defendant and that the exhibits attached to his certification, which appear to be a mortgage and note signed by defendant, were "true copies." Again, the source of this purported knowledge was not indicated. The exhibits attached to the Baxley certification did not include the purported assignment of the mortgage.

Defendant filed a cross-motion for summary judgment seeking dismissal of Wells Fargo's complaint and judgment on her counterclaim. Defendant submitted a certification in support of this motion and in opposition to Wells Fargo's motion, which alleged that most of the documents Wells Fargo produced in response to her request for production of documents relating to her application to Argent for a mortgage were forgeries. The documents defendant alleged were forgeries included a purported handwritten note by her stating that she was employed by Bergen Medical Center at a monthly salary of $9500, even though her actual income was only approximately $10,000 per year. Defendant also alleged that "[t]he estimate for closing fees that was given to me prior to closing was around $13,000.00 and the Good Faith Estimate of Closing Costs was for $13,673.90 but on the closing statement they were $36,259.06." Defendant further alleged that she was charged a "$20,000 fee to the mortgage agent" at the closing. It is unclear whether this $20,000 was part of the $36,259.06 in closing costs or an additional amount.

The trial court issued a brief oral opinion granting Wells Fargo's motion for summary judgment. The court observed that defendant "has raised numerous serious disturbing allegations relating to the originator of this loan [Argent], which if true would be a substantial violation of law and substantial violation of her rights." Nevertheless, the court concluded that those allegations did not provide a defense to Wells Fargo's foreclosure action because Wells Fargo was a "holder in due course" of the mortgage and note. The court apparently based this conclusion in part on a document attached to ...


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