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Sean L. Ingram, Sr v. Warden et al

December 17, 2010

SEAN L. INGRAM, SR., PLAINTIFF,
v.
WARDEN ET AL., DEFENDANTS.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Hillman, District Judge:

NOT FOR PUBLICATION

OPINION

Plaintiff seeks to bring this action in forma pauperis, pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1983, alleging that the conditions of his confinement amounted to a violation of his constitutional rights.*fn1

Based on his affidavit of indigence and the absence of three qualifying dismissals within 28 U.S.C. § 1915(g), the Court will grant Plaintiff's application to proceed in forma pauperis pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1915(a) and order the Clerk of the Court to file the Complaint.

At this time, the Court must review the Complaint to determine whether it should be dismissed as frivolous or malicious, for failure to state a claim upon which relief may be granted, or because it seeks monetary relief from a defendant who is immune from such relief.

I. BACKGROUND

Plaintiff's allegations are straightforward. He asserts that, upon his post-arrest admission to the Atlantic County Justice Facility ("ACJF"), Plaintiff was given a full medical examination, including testing for tuberculosis ("TB"), and his TB test came back negative. See Docket Entry No. 1, at 1. Ten months later, when Plaintiff started en route to another facility, Plaintiff was first transported to an intermediary facility where the same full medical examination was repeated, including a TB test. See id. That second TB test came TB-positive, and Plaintiff was prescribed medication. See id. From the aforesaid chain of events, Plaintiff deduces that he must have contracted TB during his ten-month stay at the ACJF,*fn2 and now sues the warden and unspecified medical staff of the ACJF citing his concerns for his family (specifically, he asserts worrying that he might eventually infect his family with TB) and his displeasure with the possibility that he might now have to take TB medication for an indefinite period of time. See id. He also complains of not being given any "counseling" addressing the emotional unease he suffers as a result of becoming a TB-carrier and the prospect of taking TB medication for life.

II. STANDARD OF REVIEW

In determining the sufficiency of a complaint, the Court must be mindful to construe the facts stated in the complaint liberally in favor of the plaintiff. See Erickson v. Pardus, 551 U.S. 89 (2007); Haines v. Kerner, 404 U.S. 519 (1972); United States v. Day, 969 F.2d 39, 42 (3d Cir. 1992). Indeed, it is long established that a court should "accept as true all of the [factual] allegations in the complaint and reasonable inferences that can be drawn therefrom, and view them in the light most favorable to the plaintiff." Morse v. Lower Merion School Dist., 132 F.3d 902, 906 (3d Cir. 1997). However, while a court will accept well-pled allegations as true, it will not accept bald assertions, unsupported conclusions, unwarranted inferences, or sweeping legal conclusions cast in the form of factual allegations. See id.

Addressing the decision of the United States Supreme Court in Bell Atl. Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544 (2007), the Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit provided the courts in this Circuit with detailed and careful guidance as to what kind of allegations qualify as pleadings sufficient to pass muster under the Rule 8 standard. See Phillips v. County of Allegheny, 515 F.3d 224, 230-34 (3d Cir. 2008). Specifically, the Court of Appeals observed as follows:

"While a complaint . . . does not need detailed factual allegations, a plaintiff's obligation [is] to provide the 'grounds' of his 'entitle[ment] to relief' [by stating] more than labels and conclusions, and a formulaic recitation of the elements of a cause of action . . . ." Twombly, 127 S. Ct. at 1964-65 . . . Rule 8 "requires a 'showing,' rather than a blanket assertion, of entitlement to relief." Id. at 1965 n.3. . . . "[T]he threshold requirement of Rule 8(a)(2) [is] that the 'plain statement [must] possess enough heft to 'sho[w] that the pleader is entitled to relief.'" Id. at 1966. [Hence] "factual allegations must be enough to raise a right to relief above the speculative level." Id. at 1965 & n.3. . . . [Indeed, it is not] sufficient to allege mere elements of a cause of action; instead "a complaint must allege facts suggestive of the proscribed conduct." Id.

Id. at 230-34 (original brackets removed).

This pleading standard was further refined by the United States Supreme Court in its recent decision Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 129 S. Ct. 1937 (2009):

[In any civil action, t]he pleading standard . . . demands more than an unadorned ["]the-defendant-unlawfully-harmed-me["] accusation. [Twombly, 550 U.S.] at 555 . . . . A pleading that offers "labels and conclusions" or "a formulaic recitation of the elements of a cause of action will not do." [Id.] at 555. Nor does a complaint suffice if it tenders "naked assertion[s]" devoid of "further factual enhancement." Id. at 557. . . . A claim has facial plausibility [only] when the plaintiff pleads factual content . . . . ...


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