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State v. Stith

December 10, 2009

STATE OF NEW JERSEY, PLAINTIFF-RESPONDENT,
v.
DESHAWN STITH, DEFENDANT-APPELLANT.



On appeal from the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Essex County, Indictment No. 98-08-3556.

Per curiam.

NOT FOR PUBLICATION WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE APPELLATE DIVISION

Submitted October 19, 2009

Before Judges Baxter and Alvarez.

Defendant DeShawn Stith appeals from the March 6, 2008 denial of his petition for post-conviction relief (PCR). We affirm.

Defendant entered guilty pleas to two counts of first-degree aggravated manslaughter, N.J.S.A. 2C:11-4a, and three counts of third-degree unlawful possession of a handgun, N.J.S.A. 2C:39-5b, on May 26, 2000. Defendant's bail was continued, and as called for by his plea agreement, he testified at the trial of a co-defendant. Defendant thereafter failed to appear, was apprehended months later in North Carolina, and was sentenced on November 9, 2000. Pursuant to the plea agreement, he received two concurrent twenty-five-year terms on the aggravated manslaughter offenses, subject to the eighty-five-percent parole disqualifier called for by the No Early Release Act (NERA), N.J.S.A. 2C:43-7.2. He was also sentenced to concurrent five-year terms on each unlawful possession of a handgun count. Defendant's appeal of his sentence was denied on February 20, 2002, as an excessive sentence oral argument.

Defendant claims that he filed a pro se petition for PCR in November 2005, just within the Rule's five-year time bar. R. 3:22-12(a). In support of this claim, he proffers a copy of the May 17, 2006 letter he wrote to the Office of the Public Defender in which he says that he filed a petition at the end of the prior year within the five-year time bar, and received no response from the court. The only filed PCR petition in the record was stamped "received" on December 19, 2006, over six years after defendant's sentence date.

Defendant pro se submitted a memorandum of law and certification in support of the December 19, 2006 petition. Counsel for defendant subsequently filed a letter brief and amended verified petition on September 21, 2007. In that brief, counsel asserts that the petition was not time-barred because defendant filed in November 2005, despite the absence of any corroborating documentation. Counsel also averred that trial counsel was ineffective due to his failure to consult with defendant prior to sentencing and to argue additional mitigating factors at sentencing. That contention dovetailed with defendant's pro se PCR claim that counsel was ineffective because he was either "precluded from arguing for a lesser term" or failed "to advance any argument in support of a lesser term."

On February 1, 2008, Judge Petrolle denied defendant's application for PCR without evidentiary hearing.*fn1 He noted preliminarily that defendant did not establish that the PCR petition was filed in a timely manner, or any excusable neglect for his failure to file within the prescribed five-year term. Judge Petrolle went on to state, however, that since no prejudice inured to the State from this "second look" at the sentence, he would nonetheless consider the matter on the merits. In doing so, he said that defendant's conduct, if presented to the jury, "might very well have supported a finding of murder . . . . This was the most cold-blooded execution called an aggravated manslaughter that one could imagine." He highlighted that defendant's cooperation with the State, the fact that alcohol was involved, and that the prior night there had been a shooting incident in which the victims were the assailants, was factored into the plea agreement. The plea agreement was very beneficial to defendant, as it called for concurrent rather than consecutive sentences for two homicides. Judge Petrolle also stated that, contrary to defendant's claim, trial counsel at the sentence hearing specifically said that he conferred with his client prior to sentencing. Counsel represented on the record in open court that during his earlier meeting with defendant, he expressed remorse and wanted to apologize to the court for his failure to appear. Judge Petrolle concluded by saying that defendant was fortunate that only the negotiated sentence was imposed despite his failure to appear and that the contentions he was raising lacked merit because they lacked "any common sense."

Defendant appeals, raising essentially the same arguments:

POINT ONE MR. STITH IS ENTITLED TO RELIEF OR A HEARING ON HIS CLAIM THAT HIS TRIAL ATTORNEY RENDERED INEFFECTIVE ASSISTANCE OF COUNSEL.

POINT TWO MR. STITH'S PETITION FOR POST-CONVICTION RELIEF IS NOT TIME-BARRED BECAUSE HIS FAILURE TO FILE HIS PETITION WITHIN FIVE YEARS OF HIS CONVICTION WAS DUE TO EXCUSABLE NEGLECT, THERE WAS NO PREJUDICE TO THE STATE, AND BECAUSE THE INTERESTS OF JUSTICE WARRANT RELAXATION OF THE TIME BAR.

A. THE TIME BAR SHOULD BE RELAXED BECAUSE DEFENDANT'S DELAY IN FILING HIS PCR PETITION WAS ...


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