Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Prusky v. Reliastar Life Insurance Co.

March 20, 2006

PAUL M. PRUSKY, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS TRUSTEE, WINDSOR SECURITIES, INC. PROFIT SHARING PLAN; STEVEN G. PRUSKY, AS TRUSTEE, WINDSOR SECURITIES, INC. PROFIT SHARING PLAN, APPELLANTS
v.
RELIASTAR LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY



Appeal from the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania District Court Civil No. 03-cv-06196 District Judge: The Honorable Herbert J. Hutton.

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Irenas, Senior District Judge.

PRECEDENTIAL

Argued January 27, 2006

Before: RENDELL and SMITH, Circuit Judges, and IRENAS, District Judge.*fn1

OPINION OF THE COURT

Paul and Steven Prusky (collectively the "Pruskys") appeal from an order of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania denying partial summary judgment on their breach of contract claims and entering summary judgment sua sponte in favor of ReliaStar Life Insurance Company ("ReliaStar"). The District Court had jurisdiction under 28 U.S.C. § 1332. We exercise appellate jurisdiction pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1291. For the reasons set forth below, we will reverse the grant of summary judgment to ReliaStar and remand the case to the District Court.

I.

Between February 1998 and March 1999, the Windsor Securities, Inc. Profit Sharing Plan (the "Plan"), through its trustees, the Pruskys, purchased seven flexible premium variable universal life insurance policies from ReliaStar. The policies, which are identical for all purposes relevant to this appeal, each named the Plan as the policies' owner and was payable on the last to die of Paul Prusky*fn2 and his wife, Susan. As of August 2, 1999, the Plan had paid almost $2.5 million in premiums for various death benefits amounting to more than $42 million. However, it is the use of the policies as an investment vehicle that is at the root of the dispute in this case.

Many traditional life insurance policies provided that a portion of the premium be set aside in a policy reserve which accrued interest at a predetermined rate, set by the terms of the policy, which is unrelated to the return on the investments made by the insurance company. This reserve is, in effect, paid out to the beneficiary as part of the face value of the policy when the insured dies, and, as the basis of the policy's cash value, can be used for borrowing or returned to the policy's owner should a decision be made to terminate the policy. See Joseph E. Irenas, Life Insurance Income Under the Federal Income Tax, 21 Tax L. Rev. 297, 297-301 (1966). "[M]ost insurance policies are not only contracts covering the risk of death, . . . but also vehicles of saving by which money is deposited with the insurance company to accumulate at interest for the benefit of the policy holder." Id. at 297.

At some point certain segments of the life insurance industry recognized that a life insurance policy which, like traditional whole life insurance, offered a fixed death benefit and a substantial savings component and, unlike a traditional policy, offered the policyholder a right to control in some fashion the investment of accumulated reserves, might be attractive to individuals who believed they had superior investment skills. The seven flexible premium variable universal life policies purchased by the Plan from Reliastar contained this investment control feature.

Pursuant to the policies' terms, ReliaStar maintained a unit investment trust, the "Variable Account." The Variable Account, in turn, was divided into various mutual fund sub-accounts, in which the Plan was entitled to invest a portion of the net premiums paid.*fn3 Thus, the cash values of the policies were tied to the market value of the assets held in the sub-accounts. The Plan's trustees often communicated daily with ReliaStar, directing the allocation of its assets among the sub-accounts in an effort to increase the cash value of the policies.*fn4

ReliaStar's standard policies provided that (1) "written" transfer requests could be made only four times in a policy year and (2) transfers would be made on the first valuation date after the request was received. The policies also provided that Reliastar could charge a fee for each transfer up to a maximum of $25.00. However, the Pruskys specifically negotiated alternate terms. The amendments to each of the seven policies were embodied in seven practically identical memoranda drafted by ReliaStar's Second Vice President, M.C. Peg Sierk (the "Sierk Memos").

First, the Sierk Memos gave the Plan the right to make daily transfers by telephone, facsimile, or other electronic means in unlimited amounts without any transfer fee. Thus the provisions facilitated the Pruskys' preferred investment strategy of making frequent trades to take advantage of short-term variations in mutual fund pricing, a practice commonly known as "market timing."*fn5

Second, the Sierk Memos allowed the Plan to execute trades until 4:00 p.m. Central Standard Time (CST) -- one hour after the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) closes at 4:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) -- and mandated that those ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.