Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

DYMBURT v. VATSALA RAO

March 29, 1995

MARIA DYMBURT, et al., plaintiffs,
v.
VATSALA RAO, M.D., et al., defendants.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: JOEL A. PISANO

 JOEL A. PISANO, U.S. MAGISTRATE JUDGE:

 Introduction

 This matter comes before the Court upon the motion of defendant Magdalina Tan, M.D. ("Dr. Tan") for partial summary judgment. Opposition was filed by plaintiffs Maria Dymburt ("Mrs. Dymburt"). Defendant Vatsala Rao, M.D. ("Dr. Rao") does not oppose the motion. *fn1" Oral argument was heard on March 27, 1995. For the reasons set forth herein, defendants' motion is granted.

 Background

 Mrs. Dymburt retained Dr. Tan to be her obstetrician gynecologist ("Ob/Gyn") for the birth of her third child in September, 1991. Dr. Tan is a solo practitioner. Thus, Mrs. Dymburt saw Dr. Tan for office visits throughout the months of her pregnancy. Dr. Tan charges a single fee for all of her services through delivery.

 Mrs. Dymburt was due to deliver her child on May 9, 1995. She had an office visit with Dr. Tan on May 8, 1995, and in fact, went into labor the next day.

 Being a solo practitioner, Dr. Tan participates in a coverage arrangement with two other doctors, Dr. Rao and Dr. Kim. The three doctors alternate weekends so that each doctor works every third weekend. The covering doctor does not receive remuneration for the work performed upon patients of another doctor.

 On May 9, 1995, Dr. Rao was on call, covering for both Dr. Tan and Dr. Kim. Thus, when Mrs. Dymburt checked into St. Peter's Hospital, Dr. Rao attended to her and handled the delivery of her child. Dr. Rao began treating Mrs. Dymburt at about 11:50 p.m. and delivered her baby approximately six hours later by cesarian section. Mrs. Dymburt's child was born with terminal brain damage and died on May 20, 1995. Mrs. Dymburt suffered a ruptured bladder and uterus. It is plaintiffs' contention that Mrs. Dymburt's injuries and her child's death were caused by the negligence of defendants Drs. Tan and Rao.

 Dr. Tan brings this motion for partial summary judgment arguing that she is only liable for her own negligence, if any, and that any negligence found against Dr. Rao may not be imputed to her as a matter of law.

 Argument

 Standard of Review

 Pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 56(c), summary judgment shall be granted if "the pleadings, depositions, answers to interrogatories, and admissions on file, together with the affidavits, if any, show that there is no genuine issue as to any material fact and that the moving party is entitled to a judgment as a matter of law." Id. In making this determination, a court must draw all inferences in favor of the non-movant. Meyer v. Riegel Prods. Corp., 720 F.2d 303, 307 fn.2 (3d Cir. 1983), cert. denied, 465 U.S. 1091, 79 L. Ed. 2d 910, 104 S. Ct. 2144 (1984). Whether a fact is "material" is determined by the substantive law defining the claims. United States v. 225 Cartons, 871 F.2d 409, 419 (3d Cir. 1989).

 When deciding a motion for summary judgment, the judge's function is not to weigh the evidence to determine the truth of the matter, but to determine whether there is a genuine issue for trial. Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242, 249, 106 S. Ct. 2505, 2511, 91 L. Ed. 2d 202 (1986). An issue is "genuine" if a reasonable jury could hold in the non-movant's favor with regard to that issue. Id. at 248. A fact is "material" if it influences the outcome of the action under the governing substantive law. Id. Summary judgment must be ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.