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Silverman v. King

Decided: May 2, 1991.

JEFFREY P. SILVERMAN, PLAINTIFF-APPELLANT,
v.
ROGER KING, DEFENDANT-RESPONDENT



On appeal from Superior Court, Law Division, Atlantic County.

J.h. Coleman and Landau. The opinion of the court was delivered by Landau, J.A.D.

Landau

This is an appeal from dismissal of a claim for punitive damages made in conjunction with the complaint of plaintiff-appellant Jeffrey P. Silverman against defendant-respondent Roger King for damages arising out of a unique assault upon Silverman in an Atlantic City casino on April 15, 1987.

Silverman was the house dealer at a high stakes baccarat table. King had placed $22,500 in bets on the hand being played, and as the highest bettor was given "courtesy" to look at the "player" hand after it was dealt. When he exercised this right, Silverman "faced" the cards and "called" a "natural eight," a hand which made it very likely that King would win a $20,000 bet. King, a large man, jubilantly rose, went behind Silverman then still engaged in "facing" and "calling" the cards for the table, and threw his right arm around Silverman's neck

and upper chest, lifting him off the floor. Silverman testified that King "lifted me off the ground by my throat and held me there with great force" for almost twenty seconds from initial contact to release. King's companion said, "Let him go" and pulled his arm from Silverman.

Silverman continued the deal, and despite discomfort, completed his shift. King told him he was only "joking around," inquired if he was "okay," and continued to play at Silverman's table.

Unfortunately, Silverman's body build and abnormal chest wall configuration rendered him particularly vulnerable to this strenuous physical embrace, well-intentioned or not. Not long after, Silverman developed symptoms of a condition diagnosed as thoracic outlet syndrome, which the jury in this case determined to have been proximately caused by the April 15 incident. That finding and the $66,000 compensatory damage award have not been challenged on appeal.

The sole issue before us is whether the essentially undisputed evidence, together with all legitimate inferences therefrom, could sustain a judgment arising from conduct which was malicious, wanton, willful or sufficiently egregious to warrant punitive damages. The trial judge granted King's motion for involuntary dismissal, reasoning that:

There is none of the malice, wantonness, willful, malicious, aggregious [sic] conduct that is required when you have punitive damages to lift the case in the area of negligence to this higher level of willful, wanton, malicious, aggregious [sic] conduct.

The man had just won $20,000 on the turn of two cards. He jumps up exuberant, as was described by the plaintiff's own witnesses, and runs over and grabs the dealer who had just dealt this $20,000 winning hand. That's all it was. There was no intention to do anything.

There was no malice. There was no willful, wanton disregard of the rights of others. There was no aggregious [sic] conduct.

We affirm substantially for the reasons expressed by the trial judge. We add our recognition that all unintended consequences of intentional but non-malicious acts are not exempt from ...


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