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Lone Pine Steering Committee v. United States Environmental Protection Agency

November 22, 1985

LONE PINE STEERING COMMITTEE, CARTER-WALLACE, INC., THE COCA-COLA COMPANY, MILLIPORE CORPORATION, MINNESOTA MINING & MANUFACTURING COMPANY, THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC., AND OWENS-ILLINOIS, INC., APPELLANTS
v.
UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, APPELLEE



APPEAL FROM THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF NEW JERSEY (D.C. CIVIL NO. 84-4513)

Author: Weis

Before: WEIS and BECKER, Circuit Judges and ZIEGLER,*fn* District Judge

Opinion OF THE COURT

WEIS, Circuit Judge.

To prevent harm from a toxic waste dump, the EPA planned construction to contain the contaminants and process ground water. On completion of the work, the EPA intends to bring suit for the costs incurred. Contending that the project was unnecessarily extensive, some of the parties allegedly responsible for the site condition sought an injunction. The district court dismissed the suit on the basis that pre-enforcement judicial review was contrary to statutory intent. We agree and affirm.

Plaintiff Steering Committee is composed of six corporations, which are part of a group of 142 companies alleged by the EPA to be responsible for the costs of remedying conditions at the Lone Pine Land Fill in Freehold, New Jersey. Investigations by the EPA revealed the presence of toxic substances dumped at the 45-acre landfill during its operation from 1959 to 1979. The area was closed in 1979.

The EPA, as well as the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, conducted various studies showing that contaminants were moving from the landfill to the Manasquan River. The toxic substances were reaching the river by two different routes, overland by surface runoff and through the permeable soil under the landfill by leaching into acquifers which discharge into the river.

Although the Manasquan River is not presently being used for drinking water, it is contemplated that in the future an intake will be constructed some 16 miles downstream from Lone Pine.

The parties disagree about the extent of contamination and its effect on the environment. However, it is undisputed that the landfill contains a substantial amount of toxic substances. Seventeen thousand drums containing chemical waste were deposited there along with more than one million gallons of hazardous bulk liquid. Because of the extent of contamination, the EPA ranked the Lone Pine site as number fifteen on the Superfund National Priority List. See 40 C.F.R. 300 (1985); Appendix B.

In 1981 and 1982, New Jersey and the EPA undertook various studies and investigation to determine whether the conditions at Lone Pine posed a threat to public health. On July 6, 1982, the EPA sent letters to fourteen firms informing each that it "may be a responsible party" with respect to the releases of hazardous substances at the landfill. An additional company received similar notice on September 3, 1982. Eventually, the EPA determined that as many as 142 entities might be responsible parties.

In an effort to select "an appropriate response action", each of the 15 companies was asked to "perform a feasibility study" to determine remedial alternatives for Lone Pine. When none of the companies offered to clean up the site, the EPA held a public meeting on September 16, 1982 to discuss its proposed plans and to consider further testing. In the Spring of 1983, five companies formed the Lone Pine Sterring Committee to evaluate conditions at the landfill and, if necessary, to develop and implement landfill and, if necessary, to develop and implement remedial action. Soon afterwards, the EPA released for comment a three volume "Draft Feasibility Study" of remedial possibilities. The study contained five alternatives, ranging from no action to complete excavation and removal of the contaminants.

Another public meeting was held on June 24, 1983. Counsel for the Steering committee was present and participated in the discussion. The EPA expressed preference for a proposal which required the placement of a clay cap over the landfill, the construction of an underground slurry wall around the site, and the pumping and treatment of contaminated groundwater lying within the wall.

Several days later, the Committee took exception to the EPA'S proposal, contending that the slurry wall and the treatment system were superfluous. The Committee suggested a clay cap and a monitoring program to detect conditions that might make further response necessary. The EPA rejected this proposal as inadequate. Observing that capping will "significantly reduce the net influx of contaminates to the river, the EPA nevertheless concluded that measure alone could not prevent contaminants from seeping into the underground water supply.

The comment period was extended, and another public meeting was scheduled. Five companies submitted comments to the EPA as did local citizens. The EPA met with the Steering Committee and two corporations during the next twelve months ...


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