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YOKEM v. GRIFFITH

July 31, 1958

Roland YOKEM, Plaintiff,
v.
Alice Shockley GRIFFITH, Executrix of the Estate of Avis W. Shockley, Deceased, Defendant



The opinion of the court was delivered by: MADDEN

This matter is presently before the Court on the plaintiff's motion for summary mary judgment pursuant to Rule 56 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, 28 U.S.C. Plaintiff, Roland Yokem, instituted action against the defendant, Alice Shockley Griffith, Executrix of the Estate of Avis W. Shockley, on two promissory notes allegedly executed by the decedent.

The complaint is stated in three counts. Counts One and Two set forth a cause on a note in the sum of $ 12,000 with interest at the rate of 3% per annum payable in 60 months 'to the order of Berry Springs Water Co., Roland Yokem, Sec.'. This note is dated, 'August 28, 1948', signed, 'Avis W. Shockley', and witnessed at the lower left corner on the face of the note, 'John D. Underkoffler, Millersburg, Pa.'. In the first count the allegation is made that the payee, Berry Springs Water Co., Roland Yokem, Sec., is a fictitious designation, that the plaintiff is and has been the owner of said note since its issuance, and that the promise to pay the amount of the note was in fact made to the plaintiff. In the second count the allegation is made that the payee, Berry Springs Water Co. assigned the note to the plaintiff by delivery and that plaintiff is the holder of said note.

 Count Three sets forth a cause upon a promissory demand note in the sum of $ 1,400 with interest at the rate of 6% payable to 'the order of the Boardwalk National Bank of Atlantic City'. This note is dated, 'August 31, 1952', and signed, 'Avis W. Shockley'. The allegation is made that the payee, Boardwalk National Bank of Atlantic City is a fictitious designation and that the plaintiff is and has been the owner of said note since its issuance.

 The defendant by answer (1) denies any indebtedness to the plaintiff by the decedent, Avis W. Shockley, (2) asserts that no cause of action is set forth in the complaint, (3) denies the execution and delivery of the notes, (4) asserts a lack of consideration for the notes, (5) asserts the forgery of the signature of Avis W. Shockley, (6) contends that the plaintiff is not a holder in due course for value or that delivery was made to the plaintiff, (7) asserts that the payees are not fictitious, or, if fictitious, that such was not known to the decedent, and finally, (8) by amended answer, the defendant contends that the notes were altered and that the statute of limitation bars such action upon the notes.

 In support of his motion for summary judgment and in addition to his own affidavit, the plaintiff has filed the following affidavits:

 First. The affidavit of John D. Underkoffler, whose name appears as a witness on the $ 12,000 note, who describes the transaction, the nature of the conversation, the execution of the note by the decedent, the passing of the money and the transfer of the note to plaintiff.

 Second. The affidavit of Robert Travitz, the present secretary-treasurer of Berry Springs Water Co., who avers that the controlling interest of said Company passed from the plaintiff to him and that the note was not the property of the Company but belonged to the plaintiff.

 Third. The affidavit of Claire § . Barker, sister of both defendant and decedent, who avers that she has examined both the $ 12,000 and $ 1,400 notes and that the signature thereon is the signature of her sister, Avis W. Shockley.

 Fourth. The affidavit of Emma Townsend, likewise a sister of both the defendant and the decedent, who also identifies the signature on both notes as that of her sister, Avis W. Shockley.

 '6. From these communications, I am convinced and verily believe that my sister was not indebted to the plaintiff in any sum or did she execute and deliver these alleged notes to the plaintiff. I am also convinced and believe that the signature on the alleged $ 12,000. note is not the signature of my sister, and if the signature on the alleged $ 1,400. note is the signature of my sister, then I believe it was never delivered by my sister to the plaintiff or there was never any consideration therefor.'

 It is worthy of note at this point that the complaint was filed August i3, 1957, and the matter argued January 17, 1958, but that there is no affidavit of any handwriting expert or other person, including the defendant, that he has examined the notes and that in his opinion (by direct words) the signatures thereon are not the signatures of decedent.

 The Court is extremely mindful of the directions enunciated by upper Courts on the use and disposition of motions for summary judgment; such motions are not to serve as a substitute for trial by jury nor as a means to try by affidavits disputed issues of fact. Under Rule 56 it is the function of trial courts to determine whether a genuine issue of material fact exists to be tried and the Court may only grant a movant judgment upon his motion when it is clear that there is no genuine issue as to any material fact. See Powell v. Fuller Brush Co., D.C.N.J.1954, 15 F.R.D. 239; and Sarnoff v. Ciaglia, 3 Cir., 1947, 165 F.2d 167.

 Jurisdiction of this Court having been invoked on the grounds of diversity, the law of New Jersey is applicable. Thus, the plaintiff is entitled to the benefit ...


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