Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

State v. Rosenberg

Decided: October 6, 1955.

THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY, PLAINTIFF-RESPONDENT,
v.
SAMUEL ROSENBERG, DEFENDANT-APPELLANT, AND MARGARET BRANNICK, DEFENDANT



Clapp, Jayne and Francis. The opinion of the court was delivered by Francis, J.A.D.

Francis

[37 NJSuper Page 199] The defendant Samuel Rosenberg was indicted for procuring for purposes of prostitution contrary to N.J.S. 2 A:133-2. On the same day, the defendant Margaret

Brannick was indicted separately for offering and agreeing to receive certain named persons for the purposes of "prostitution, lewdness and assignation" in violation of the same statute. Both indictments arose out of the same set of circumstances and by consent they were tried together.

The jury found both defendants guilty. Rosenberg alone appeals, alleging error (1) in the denial of his motion for a severance, (2) in the charge of the court, and (3) in the denial of his motion for a judgment of acquittal on the ground of entrapment.

When the case was called for trial, a colloquy ensued between the court, the prosecutor and counsel for both defendants, Rosenberg and Brannick, in which it was stipulated that the indictments be tried at the same time. As far as the record shows, there was no inquiry by either defense counsel as to whether any statement or confession had been made by the other defendant inculpating his client.

In the course of the prosecutor's opening to the jury, it became perfectly plain that the State had a confession from the defendant Brannick which made inculpatory references to Rosenberg. Further, during this opening when the prosecutor mentioned some oral statements of Rosenberg, counsel for Brannick objected to them as not being binding on his client as they were not made in her presence. And the court at once advised the jury that such statements could not in any way be binding on her. Thus it may be said that at the very outset of the trial and before any proof was offered, all counsel were aware of this well settled rule and the way in which it would undoubtedly be applied.

In presenting its case, the State produced a voluntary confession of Margaret Brannick, which had been given in question and answer form in the presence of Rosenberg, who signed it as a witness. The prosecutor proved that not only did Rosenberg refuse to make a statement himself, but also that at the conclusion of the taking of the Brannick confession, when asked if what she had said was true, he denied it. The confession was admitted in evidence after both the court and the prosecutor had recognized the validity of the

objection that it was in no way binding on Rosenberg. The court said that "the statement can only be binding upon the person who signed it" and he instructed the jury "to disregard any statement or any mention in the statement about Mr. Rosenberg, and it may not be used to infer any guilt as far as this charge is concerned." Whereupon the prosecutor said: "I agree, sir," and Rosenberg's attorney said: "That is the law."

The confession was then read to the jury and at the conclusion of the reading, the prosecutor added to what he had already said:

"Mr. Diamond: Your Honor please, before I proceed may I again emphasize the fact that I heartily agree with your Honor's ruling that this applies to the defendant Brannick, and while the entire statement is admissible, there are statements in here referring to the defendant Rosenberg, and in fairness to all concerned, the jury, I would like to emphasize that this goes as to the defendant Brannick only."

The Court: I so instructed the jury."

The confession contained some allusions to the fact that Rosenberg and Brannick had been engaging in sexual relations with each other for a number of years. This portion could have been deleted on motion. State v. Schmieder , 5 N.J. 40, 47 (1950). Apparently, however, counsel was satisfied with the court's ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.