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Bond v. Bond

Decided: June 10, 1955.

CORRINE L. BOND, PLAINTIFF-APPELLANT,
v.
ELMER H. BOND, DEFENDANT-RESPONDENT



Goldmann, Freund and Conford.

Per Curiam

[36 NJSuper Page 17] On June 19, 1950 plaintiff obtained a judgment in her separate maintenance action against defendant directing that he pay her $30 a week for her support and maintenance and that of the minor child of the marriage, beginning with January 6, 1950, and awarding custody of the child to plaintiff, with right of visitation in defendant.

Certain other relief, not significant to this appeal, was granted. Thereafter the court on July 6, 1950 awarded a writ of ne exeat against defendant, endorsed in the sum of $5,000. Defendant posted cash security the next day.

Four years later defendant moved to vacate the judgment, to discharge the writ of ne exeat and cash bond posted thereunder, and for certain other relief. On December 3, 1954 the court by separate orders (1) denied the application to vacate the judgment but discharged the writ, defendant having furnished a bond of $3,500 to insure the support and maintenance of his minor child, and (2) dismissed plaintiff's counter-motion that the $3,500 bond secure not only the payments for the support and maintenance of the child, but also her own support and maintenance. Plaintiff appeals.

A clear understanding of the matter requires a somewhat extended recounting of defendant's marital affairs.

Elmer Bond married Margaret Bond in 1924. Two children were born of that union, both now of age. In February 1935 he took Margaret and the children to Florida. The circumstances of their going there are somewhat vague. There is testimony that Elmer had been separated from Margaret some time before, that he had become involved with another woman, and that the purpose of going to Florida was to effect a reconciliation. About a month later he told his wife to return home to New Jersey with the children and that he would follow. She did so, but he remained in Florida, living with his parents in Miami Beach until late in April 1936. Several months after Margaret left, Elmer met Corrine L. Foy, a divorced woman. She knew he was married, and when he became interested in obtaining a divorce from Margaret she referred him to the attorney who had represented her in her own divorce proceedings. At the close of February 1936 Elmer instituted divorce proceedings in Dade County, Florida, based on Margaret's alleged extreme cruelty and desertion. Thereupon Margaret filed a complaint in our former Court of Chancery seeking to restrain him from proceeding with that action, and on April 2, 1936 she commenced a separate maintenance suit against him in

the same court. Elmer nonetheless went ahead with his divorce and on April 23, 1936 obtained a final decree by whose terms he was to pay Margaret $30 a week for the support and maintenance of herself and the two children of the marriage. Four days later he entered into a ceremonial marriage with Corrine at Tampa, Florida. Soon after the newly married couple returned to live in New Jersey, where they have been resident ever since. One child was born of that marriage.

Following his return to New Jersey Elmer and Margaret (and a named trustee) entered into a separation agreement whereby he was to pay her $30 a week for her support and maintenance and that of the two children. The separate maintenance action then pending between them was to be discontinued. Elmer also conveyed to her his interest in their former marital home, owned as tenants by the entirety. At the time of the agreement, Margaret did not know of the Florida divorce; in fact, she first learned of it in 1947 through Corrine, who told her of the second marriage and the child born of it.

Elmer and Corrine lived together as husband and wife in New Jersey until May 1947. Thereafter Corrine instituted a separate maintenance action based on Elmer's extreme cruelty, resulting in the judgment of June 19, 1950 and the writ of ne exeat already referred to. The judgment was affirmed on appeal. Elmer failed to comply fully with the terms of the judgment, with the result that Corrine instituted contempt proceedings. His defense was that he was obliged to pay support for his first wife and children and could not afford to pay both Margaret and Corrine $30 each. The trial court found him in contempt. On appeal the Appellate Division reversed. Bond v. Bond , 16 N.J. Super. 83 (1951).

At the time of that appeal there was pending an action instituted by Elmer against Margaret on February 7, 1951, whereby he sought to have their separation agreement reviewed and the $30 weekly payments provided therein reduced. Margaret filed an answer and counterclaim to set

aside the Florida divorce and for a divorce from Elmer on the ground of his desertion in March 1935. She then obtained an order making Corrine a party defendant. Corrine thereupon filed an answer and separate defenses denying the fraud charged as to Elmer's Florida residence and his subsequent remarriage, or that she had knowledge at the time of her marriage of any matrimonial injunctive order obtained by Margaret. She claimed that Margaret knew of her marriage to Elmer prior to the separation agreement of July 2, 1936 and was guilty of laches; that she was estopped from contesting the validity of the Florida divorce because of her knowledge of the divorce and remarriage; and that Elmer had a bona fide residence in Florida before instituting his suit for divorce against Margaret, so that the divorce decree ...


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