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UNITED STATES AND INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION v. BUTLER COUNTY RAILROAD COMPANY

May 25, 1914

UNITED STATES AND INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION
v.
BUTLER COUNTY RAILROAD COMPANY



APPEAL FROM THE UNITED STATES COMMERCE COURT

White, McKenna, Holmes, Day, Lurton, Hughes, Van Devanter, Lamar, Pitney

Author: Day

[ 234 U.S. Page 31]

 MR. JUSTICE DAY delivered the opinion of the court.

The appellee, the Butler County Railroad Company, filed with the Interstate Commerce Commission its petition asking for the reestablishment of through routes and joint rates with certain trunk lines, which was consolidated with and decided upon the same record as the complaints before the Commission in the Tap Line Cases involved in

[ 234 U.S. Page 32]

     the previous cases, Nos. 829 to 836, just decided, ante, p. 1. The general statement of the Commission in its report and supplemental report filed April 23, and May 14, 1912 (23 I.C.C. 277, 549) referred to in those cases preceded the following findings of fact:

The Butler County Railroad Company, the Brooklyn Cooperage Company, which owns the Railroad Company, and the Great Western Land Company, owning most of the timber reached by the railroad, are all subsidiaries of the American Sugar Refining Company.

The tap line, which was acquired from the Cooperage Company, consists of a section of track at Linstead, near Poplar Bluff, Missouri, extending into the plant of the Cooperage Company and connecting it with the St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern Railway and the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad, which are within three-quarters of a mile of the plant, and the principal track extending about seven miles from Lowell Junction, a station on the Iron Mountain 7 1/2 miles from Poplar Bluff, to Baileys, with a branch about 3 miles from Rossville, an intermediate point, and with trackage rights over unincorporated spurs from Baileys belonging to the Cooperage Company, and over the Iron Mountain from Lowell Junction to Poplar Bluff, paying for the latter 65c a train mile for 25 cars. It has 2 locomotives, 2 passenger coaches, 3 cabooses and about 100 freight and log cars.

The tap line hauls the logs, all of which are hardwood, from a connection with the unincorporated track to Lowell Junction, then over the Iron Mountain to Linstead and thence to the mill over its own track, where they are unloaded by the Cooperage Company. The regular manufacturing rate under the Missouri distance tariff is charged the Cooperage Company by the tap line, 1 to 1 1/2c per 100 pounds, approximately $4 per car. The loaded cars are switched to the Frisco or Iron Mountain, less than one

[ 234 U.S. Page 33]

     mile, and the appellee receives from them an allowance of from 2 to 5c per 100 pounds. The rates from tap line points, including the mill at Linstead, are in all cases 2c higher than the rates of the trunk lines from Poplar Bluff, excepting to New Orleans and New York, to which points most of the shipments of the Cooperage Company go, and to which Poplar Bluff rates apply.

One hundred and eighty-four thousand six hundred and eighty-eight tons of forest products and 2,475 tons of other freight were hauled during the year ending June 30, 1910; of the first amount 107,527 tons being furnished by the controlling interests, 77,161 tons by outsiders, but all the timber coming from the lands of the Great Western Land Company, and of the miscellaneous freight 1,195 tons of inbound machinery and coal being for the proprietary companies. Passenger revenues were $4,104.22. Three mixed trains in each direction are operated daily between Linstead and Melville, a point beyond Baileys on the unincorporated track, two being used principally for passenger service.

The Great Western Land Company furnishes timber to several independent industries on the tracks of the tap line near Linstead, the tap line switching their product to the trunk lines. Their factory sites are leased from the Cooperage Company, the purpose of making such leases being to secure traffic upon which the tap line might obtain divisions. A few independent producers on the main track of the tap line team their supplies and ship their products over the tap line. They pay ...


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