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GLASPELL v. NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY.

decided: April 4, 1892.

GLASPELL
v.
NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY.



ERROR TO THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE DISTRICT OF NORTH DAKOTA.

Author: Fuller

[ 144 U.S. Page 216]

 MR. CHIEF JUSTICE FULLER delivered the opinion of the court.

The constitution of North Dakota was submitted to a vote of the people on the first Tuesday in October, 1889, (falling that year on the first day of the month,) at which time all the State and District officers created and made elective by the instrument, including the judges of the Supreme and District Courts, were elected, it being also provided that they should take the required oaths of office within sixty days after the proclamation of the President admitting the State. This was

[ 144 U.S. Page 217]

     issued November 2, 1889, but during the interval, from October 1 to the qualification of the judges, the continuity of the courts was preserved by the sixth section of the schedule to the constitution, (Laws N. Dakota, 1891, p. 55,) which reads thus:

"§ 6. Whenever any two of the judges of the Supreme Court of the State, elected under the provisions of this constitution shall have qualified in their offices, the causes then pending in the Supreme Court of the Territory on appeal or writ of error from the District Courts of any county or subdivision within the limits of this State, and the papers, records and proceedings of said court shall pass into the jurisdiction and possession of the Supreme Court of the State, except as otherwise provided in the Enabling Act of Congress, and until so superseded the Supreme Court of the Territory and the judges thereof shall continue, with like powers and jurisdiction as if this constitution had not been adopted. Whenever the judge of the District Court of any district elected under the provisions of this constitution shall have qualified in his office, the several causes then pending in the District Court of the Territory within any county in such district, and the records, papers and proceedings of said District Court, and the seal and other property pertaining thereto, shall pass into the jurisdiction and possession of the District Court of the State for such county, except as provided in the Enabling Act of Congress, and until the District Courts of this Territory shall be superseded in the manner aforesaid, the said District Courts and the judges thereof shall continue with the same jurisdiction and power to be exercised in the same judicial districts respectively as heretofore constituted under the laws of the Territory."

The twenty-third section of the act of Congress of February 22, 1889, entitled, "An act to provide for the division of Dakota into two States and to enable the people of North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana and Washington, to form constitutions and state governments and to be admitted into the Union on an equal footing with the original States and to make donations of public lands to such States," is as follows:

"SEC. 23. That in respect to all cases, proceedings and

[ 144 U.S. Page 218]

     matters now pending in the Supreme or District Courts of either of the Territories mentioned in this act at the time of the admission into the Union of either of the States mentioned in this act and arising within the limits of any such State, whereof the Circuit or District Courts by this act established might have had jurisdiction under the laws of the United States had such courts existed at the time of the commencement of such cases, the said Circuit and District Courts, respectively, shall be the successors of said Supreme and District Courts of said Territory; and in respect to all other cases, proceedings and matters pending in the Supreme or District Courts of any of the Territories mentioned in this act at the time of the admission of such Territory into the Union, arising within the limits of said proposed State, the courts established by such State shall, respectively, be the successors of said Supreme and District Territorial courts; and all the files, records, indictments and proceedings relating to any such cases, shall be transferred to such Circuit, District and state courts, respectively, and the same shall be proceeded with therein in due course of law; but no writ, action, indictment, cause or proceeding now pending, or that prior to the admission of any of the States mentioned in this act, shall be pending in any territorial court in any of the Territories mentioned in this act, shall abate by the admission of any such State into the Union, but the same shall be transferred and proceeded with in the proper United States Circuit, District or state court, as the case may be; Provided, however, That in all civil actions, causes and proceedings, in which the United States is not a party, transfers shall not be made to the Circuit and District Courts of the United States, except upon written request of one of the parties to such action or proceeding filed in the proper court; and in the absence of such request such cases shall be proceeded with in the proper state courts." (25 Stat. c. 180, 676, 683.)

This section embodies the view thus expressed by Mr. Justice Clifford, speaking for the court, in Baker v. Morton, 12 Wall. 150, 153: "Whenever a Territory is admitted into the Union as a State, the cases pending in the territorial courts

[ 144 U.S. Page 219]

     of a Federal character or jurisdiction are transferred to the proper Federal court, but all such as are not cognizable in the Federal courts are transferred to the tribunals of the new State. Pending cases, where the Federal and state courts have concurrent jurisdiction, may be transferred either to the ...


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